Chuka University

EFFECTIVENESS OF PRINCIPALS IN PROVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP: A CASE OF MERU SOUTH DISTRICT, KENYA

EDWARD PATRICK GITONGA KATHUNI

ABSTRACT

School managers are responsible for the core functions of the schools, that is, curriculum and instructional leadership. The principal is the pivot around which many aspects of the school revolve,  being  the person in charge of every details of running the school; academic, administrative, curriculum and instruction.  The  study sought to investigate  effectiveness of secondary school principals  in provision of  curriculum and instructional leadership  in  schools in  Meru South District, Kenya. The objectives of the study were to establish effectiveness of principals in provision of adequate resources, supervision and evaluation of curriculum and instruction in  schools in Meru South District. The study adopted descriptive survey research design. The study was conducted in 48 public secondary schools. The population of the study was 483 subjects, a sample size of 120 subjects comprising of 24 principals,  and 96  teachers was used in the study. Data was collected by  use of questionnaires. A pilot study was conducted to establish the reliability of the instruments. Test-retest technique using Spearman Brown Prophecy Formula to estimate reliability was  used and  a coefficient of 0.847 was obtained. Data collected was coded and analyzed by the use of descriptive statistics facilitated by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 for Windows. The information was presented in form of tables. In terms of provision of resource the study  established  that principals were effective in provision of physical facilities, playing fields, textbooks and teaching staff. However, principals were ineffective in provision of staff houses, land for expansion and  teaching and learning aids. The findings of the study also indicated that principals were effective in providing teacher guides,  programming terms activities  and timetabling. Principals were ineffective in teacher performance appraisal, supervising classroom teaching and developing skills.  It was  found  that most of the principals were effective in  offering remedial teaching, setting targets and analyzing examination results.  The study indicated that principals were ineffective in  checking  teachers  lesson plans, checking student‟s  notes and class attendance. The intervention measures suggested included more funding for schools to enable provision of resources and delegating of duties.  It is hoped that the findings and recommendations of this study will assist policy makers, curriculum developers, educational planners, and other stakeholders to make curriculum and instruction leadership more effective and therefore improve in the effectiveness of principals in curriculum and instructional leadership.

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